Gestalt Racquetball Stroke Part 2

The Downswing or Contact Phase

 

—> Here ball striking magic begins! = Also swinging myths are debunked and mysteries are revealed and solved…
 
—> Swing secret = Here we are at shotmaking time. Although this is similar to a How-to Golf or Tennis instructional, this technique break down is different in that up until now there’s been no soup to nuts How to Hit a Racquetball. This is a full set of technical details, including an explanation of the VITAL final arm and wrist spiral motion that climaxes in setting your racquet face to shape your pictured shot. Now, HERE is the compleat contact swing…
—> How and why have a full forward swing? = First, recall this is a full stroke, not a hammer strike. Your forward swing doesn’t stop at a nail. Your swing doesn’t stop at the ball. Swing all the way thru the ball, and beyond. Swing forward AFTER you get ready with your bounce-timed “backswing” loop of the racquet to head high. Note that if the ball is moving quicker or quicker getting on you, you must speed up your prep with a more compact stroke or shorter stroke. This treatment is for the full stroke. We’ll discuss a compact stroke later. Now…after contact, include in your full “downswing” loop a full, consistency enhancing, energy releasing follow-through…Your body and shot making accuracy will thank you for it…
—> Stroke momentum = Below the KEY sources of optimum stroking momentum or sources of contact swinging force are highlighted in bold print and numbered (1)-(12)…
 
—> As a time saver, here is the abbreviated list…the short version of those 12 key momentum keys
 
—> (a) First, retain a swing image as you attack the ball: Always start with an inside out swing path = Even for a primarily outside in swing, start with an inside motion…more on that in a sex…
 
—> The 12 downswing steps include…
 
(1) Push off = Lean in off back foot and sway sideways…while, at the same time…
 
(2) …Draw in off arm = Fold in off arm to your side connecting both shoulders to spin throughout…*Note, for your backhand, after starting with fold in move, follow your racquet arm forward with your off arm until both arms end up out in front of you for much better recovery balance…
 
…at the same time as you draw in your off arm and push off your back foot…
 
(3) Loop racquet arm down = …initially begin with a small arc down with your elbow in tight to you, and toss linked forearm pointing back, while beginning dual shoulder rotation in classic throwing motion.
 
(1a) …Drive knees = Upgrade push off and swaying sideways into knee drive and lower body rotation.
 
(4) Exchange shoulder levels = As shoulders spin inside your contact spot, (magically) invert shoulder heights, by dropping back chest area, which fosters unwinding shoulders together, as diamond formed by shoulders and waist turns thru until your chest faces target.
 
(5) Bridge = …as elbow draws forward, below put on legs brake and crunch non racquet side core, allowing both shoulders to come firing thru, as elbow arc forward is reaching shoulder depth…
 
(6) Twist racquet arm into torsion = Also while arcing elbow up toward racquet arm shoulder, rear back and windup arm. There at loop’s bottom naturally, slightly decrease space between lower arm and upper arm, twisting and loading up elbow into torsion, while drawing forearm in to you and pointing back – lagging, looming, ready…
 
(7) Cock wrist = As arm rears back, at loop’s bottom, lastly twist up wrist by drawing thumb into forearm right before monster torquing of both racquet arm and wrist twisting and arcing out as your SNAP!…fiercely sweeping racquet head out thru ball.
 
(8) Reach out = As ball nears contact spot, ATTACK by catapulting bent elbow arcing out (a short ways) buoyed by body turn, dual shoulder spin, and triceps arrowing arm.
 
(9) …Flow thru butt to target = Swing around with racquet butt cap very briefly pointing at shot target, in this classic interim forward swing phase, while keeping…arm still bent; elbow still twisted; wrist still cocked just a beat longer; and strings turning to briefly face sidewall – …arm and wrist are readying for contact zone’s final, committed, forceful racquet head wave out thru the ball.
 
(10) Flip forearm = As ball nears, quickly begin (magical) wave of forearm from pointing back to pointing forward, in the blink of an eye. Turn over forearm at the elbow (an action that looks like an upside down windshield wiper). And also weave in your wrist with forearm, as you…
(11) SuperFast turn over forearm interweaving with rolling wrist = Spiral forearm meshing with wrist roll. There, right as ball closes in on off shoulder contact spot (out front) and arm is just about to arrow, in mid forearm wave, SuperFast turn over your forearm releasing and fluidly (magically) interweaving wrist with extending arm, rolling both forearm and wrist together into Snappow! Snap arm PLUS wrist powerfully spiraling racquet head arcing thru the ball.
 
(12) Finish arcing wrist and arm pulling inwards = ALWAYS finish swing pulling inwardly with your arm and wrist curve. That pulling in action accentuates curving and rolling over your weaving forearm and wrist together into a whip cracking contact climax. Even pull in when completing your swing flowing in to out away from you, like when you hit with your back to one sidewall and you’re shooting an inside out V pass cross-court targeting the front wall halfway over from contact to the far sidewall which will cause the ball to rebound off and angle directly toward the far, rear corner.
—> Because it’s massive let’s first discuss shot angling = Critically how do you angle your shots?
–> Shot angling results from 4 factors, or 5 different frame…
(1) –> Ball focus = you pick part of ball you’re attacking with your racquet head. For example, for contact above shin high, you often seek to angle your shot downwards into your front wall or sidewall target. There you strike the ball just above center in back with the racquet sweet spot, or you might think of it as dropping the ball slightly on your strings;
(2) –> Part of strings = …you pick the part of the strings on your racquet to place on part of the ball you pick;
(3) –> Racquet Flow = your swing thru is a directional combo of racquet flow both side to side, as you flow thru ball on toward your front wall or sidewall target, and your swing also defines your vertical shot angle, which is mostly downwards, very rarely upward, and infrequently straight ahead (except when you’re able to make very, very, very low contact at ankle bone low to shoot straight into your wall target); and
(4) –> Strings angle = Right as you turn your racquet face thru the ball, you own timing of how the strings slant right as you roll your racquet head thru the ball. Beveling or slanting of your strings to lean forward thru contact is common. Hardly ever will you slant your strings backwards, except when flicking a get re-kill in the front court, when using a very compact slice swing. Only when the ball is very low will you approach contact with a flat, parallel the front wall racquet face;
(5) –> as a paradigm shift…place ball on your adaptive racquet face = Instead of focusing on part of ball or your racquet flow or a spot on sweet sport or your racquet face angle thru contact, as a totally different concept, feel for flowing thru the ball while adjusting the ball on your strings, to form familiar shot angles. As examples…(1) Push ball away from you on your strings = an inside out angle to veer shot out away from you toward side you face, as sidewall shot or DTL; (2) Pull ball in on your strings = cross-court shot angling ball across your body; (3) Drop ball on your strings = swing over top the ball adding topspin and veering your shot downwards, creating a low ball with keep-it-down-low overspin.
 
The Thru Swing or Contact Swing…
 
—> …Swing Imagery = Retain YOUR own key swing image, such as…from an arm-centric perspective…
—> (a) Inside out swing path = As you swing forward, carry image of ALWAYS starting with an inside out swing path. Start EVERY forward swing path with your initial downswing arm loop arcing in close to you. Then, when it’s time to attack the ball, your loop will change to flow out away from you, via a quick, short, elbow first outwards arc. Initially start from your timed to ball speed looped up and back prep. Then, as ball is closing in on your contact spot (off shoulder), transition into your downswing loop, with barely a beat between your back and down loops. First, while arcing your flexed elbow down draw it in tight to you, as your forearm also arcs to point back. There your racquet arm elbow is curving forward until coming up just short of level with your racquet arm shoulder. Then, as ball is almost at your contact point and your elbow is drawing up to right behind shoulder, arc elbow outwards altering your racquet loop to flow out attacking your preselected contact spot in front of your racquet arm shoulder. There your swing motion unconsciously will shift your loop of bent elbow and trailing forearm to take a small, quick arc out away from you. The inside first path sets you up for that very quick outwards loop that curves around thru ball, with your racquet head building mass by coming from behind. It’s very important you begin that sweeping out section with elbow still leading and arm still bent. That will allow you to snap your arm AND wrist together to powerfully swing thru the ball. As you flow your elbow out away from you, at first you’ll arrow your arm by starting to extend. After that first arrowing, you’ll spiral over your forearm and wrist (with lots more on that spiraling action to come). There you’ll turn over your arm at the elbow. Right before the ball reaches your contact spot off shoulder, you’ll turn over your arm AND add in releasing your wrist and rolling them both over together snapping or torquing or twisting both your forearm and wrist. That action fires your racquet head thru the ball. There, in your contact zone that begins when your elbow is almost drawn up to your shoulder in close to you, you’ll flow the racquet head out thru the ball on a final, flat arching swing plane. That’s where, by feel, you control your racquet face by putting your strings on the part of ball you pick. You’ll flow your racquet head thru the ball and then on toward your shot target. By feel and muscle memory, thru contact you’ll angle your racquet face to make your picked, pictured and ultimately shaped shot path.
—> The Downswing in great detail = Note that the thru swing is divided into two basic parts: (1) the first part is up until you windup your arm at the bottom of your loop’s initial down arc, as you draw your elbow up to shoulder depth; and (2) the second part is when your body catapults your arm arcing out in the second half of the down loop when you arc out and roll over snapping both your arm and wrist together, rocketing your racquet head thru the ball directing its flight via racquet face control. First, let’s review the action of setting your feet in your striking stance and …
—> …Primer on keys to optimum striking stance setting = Ideally set your most advantageous striking stance…You stepped back setting your back foot pointing it at the sidewall. There the back foot is closed or parallel with the front wall. Then you stepped up anchoring your front foot. As front foot touched down, with its toes both out a little closer to sidewall (in a partially closed stance) and toes pointing slightly forward, the front foot pressed back. The press back is the final load back on your back foot, as you max out your backswing loop to head high. The front foot is ready to accept forward weight transfer and ideally body turn onto it…with no delay, begin your forward swing…
—>  (1) Push off back foot = Initiate downswing a heartbeat after loading closed back foot with toes pointing at sidewall. Again…you’ve lifted racquet, as it has looped up and back, while setting your full stance in a two-step move. First, you stepped back with back foot. Then, when stepping up with front foot, you pressed back, emphasizing your full racquet arm loop back. That doubly achieves your objective of a final load back = weight shift + racquet lift …then, without delay, start downswing…as you push off back foot and immediately sway sideways into your set, absorbing (pulling forward) front foot. Note that your optimal goal for every stroke is to swing from a very balanced, weight transferring AND ideally shifting into your rotating striking stance. Yet it’s key to do the best with what you’ve set. Keep back foot anchored. Don’t drag it forward. It’s ideal to pivot on the ball of your back foot throughout your forward swing (as if you were squishing a bug under your back foot). Also, at the same time as you push off, start swinging BOTH arms, as you…
—> …(2) Draw in off arm, …to your middle, along with push off…for each stroke…
-> …for Forehand…initiate upper body and dual arm swing…by subtly drawing in bent off arm’s hand toward your rib cage. This is part of your dual arm swing. The off arm fold in works to shut down your front shoulder. That joins your front shoulder to your back shoulder so it becomes a dual shoulder turn that builds up to projecting your racquet arm (elbow) out to attack the ball when it’s right there –>. At the same time that your off arm is drawing in, you’re beginning your small arc down with your bent racquet arm that’s matched by tossing back your forearm. So racquet arm arc is happening along with off arm fold in. This dual arm motion is like readying to make your sidearm ball toss forehand. As a visual, the dual arm forehand racquet throwing action is like reaching back and skimming a flat stone on a glassy body of water. To skim a stone, in your throwing motion that’s just like a forehand stroke, draw stone up and back, as forefinger and thumb balance flat stone, readying. Then draw in off arm as you also begin looping and flowing throwing your arm elbow and trailing stone into a slot out to your side. As your arm gets low, with both shoulders turning, release and arrow your arm to skip your stone very low on a flat plane toward bouncing several skips across the water’s surface. Although no skipping in your racquetball shots!…
-> …for Backhand…to skim a frisbee for your backhand…let off arm begin to draw in, as initial hug move starts DUAL shoulder rotation and dual arm swing. It’s an off arm hurl. After that initial fold in, your off arm hand shadows your racquet arm whose elbow is leading the dual shoulders as they arc forward, too. As your racquet arm elbow arcs to drop, it’s matched by the racquet arm forearm dropping backwards to point straight back. With off arm trailing, your racquet arm elbow will arc forward until it draws up almost to racquet arm shoulder depth. There your elbow is just above your planned contact height. After off arm initial draws in, that off arm, led by your hand, continues flowing forward trailing after your racquet arm’s arc throughout your contact swing. That dual arm move adds great swing momentum by keeping your shoulders connected and turning throughout your downswing. Then, with off arm flowing forward and finishing out front, that flow allows you to finish on optimal balance where you’re able to optimally recover quickly to move and defend your shot placement…
—> …now the third swing starter = Along with push off and off arm fold in, arc your racquet arm down as the beginning of your building, increasing downswing loop. It begins initially with that arc being an inwards arc down, as you…
—>  (3) Arc elbow down = Along with off arm fold-in and back foot push off, lead racquet arm with bent elbow, as you BEGIN elaborate racquet arm loop down. The adjective “elaborate” is used because it’s actually an arm loop made up of dual, connected arcs. The loop to make contact is an elaborate orchestration of your arm and wrist synchronous mechanics. First, start by driving your elbow down and forward in a small arc, while drawing your elbow in tight to you. Then, when you’re ready to attack ball, just as ball is arriving at your contact point, you’ll transition to naturally curve your elbow out away from you boosted by your building dual shoulder spin. That arc out occurs when your elbow draws up almost reaching your racquet arm shoulder depth. Then, to attack the ball, your elbow will flow out in an even smaller but quicker arc away from you. For the ending, you’ll flow your forearm, wrist and racquet head out, around and swinging thru the ball. In that arc out, it’s very key that you’ll roll over BOTH your forearm and wrist. As you first start arrowing your arm, you’ll then begin momentously waving your racquet head thru the ball. That wave action is based on how you turn over your arm AND your wrist together. To swing thru on the shot angle YOU choose, you’ll also point your strings toward your shot target right as your racquet face is making ball contact. That racquet face pointing shapes your shots angle. You may angle your racquet face in or out, as well as up, straight (flat) or most commonly down. Shot shaping often occurs based on how your strings bevel or slant forwards, as well as potentially pointing the strings in or out right as you swing thru the part of the ball you pick with your racquet head. Routinely your shot paths will angle downwards. You could strike a flat ball, especially at super low contact. Rarely will you slice your shot, when making contact with a leaning back racquet face. By starting your arm loop down in tight to you for each stroke, you’ll build great outwards momentum into arcing your bent arm and trailing racquet out away from you. With off arm assist and led by your racquet arm elbow arc, you’ll strongly rotate both shoulders, too, which builds into an arm hurl out and initial arm extension. Then your loop climax will pinnacle or peak the building force of spiraling together your forearm, wrist and racquet head thru contact, with images of…
–> …for your forehand…picture a strong sidearm racquet toss = With bent elbow leading, draw elbow arcing down in tight to you. There, via your forward elbow arc, your forearm also arcs down to trail. Your racquet arm loads up at the bottom of your loop. While drawing it forward, your forearm twists in towards you. There’ll be more on THAT BIG arm torsion WINDUP in just a sec……
-> …for your backhand…picture a frisbee hurl backhand swing = With elbow leading, arc elbow down flattening out and pointing your forearm back. Draw elbow into you arcing forward, as arm will windup into increased elbow flexion, while elbow draws up almost to racquet arm shoulder level. That’s right before you’ll attack with your arcing frisbee release out, via a very strong outwards arc powered by your shoulders hurling your arm and joining with your wrist into a spiraling, accelerating arm-wrist snap climax…
—>  …Backhand elbow catch drill = As a technique booster for your backhand swing motion…to seal the effect of your backhand arm loop…drill while swinging without a ball. Repeat this backhand elbow catch and release drill to build up your form. From full loop backswing, practice arcing elbow (and trailing racquet) down initially drawing your arm in tight to you. When elbow arcs to almost racquet arm shoulder depth, catch and quickly release elbow with your off arm hand right before your elbow would arc out. There release your elbow allowing your elbow-led arm to sweep out away from you into its small outwards arc. Emphasize your down arc’s strength so it builds to a crescendo where your arm motion is primed to fly out away from you very strongly curving out. Feed off the initial arc down and your building dual shoulder spin. Both arc shoulders work core to catapult your racquet arm out away from you. After the release out, your arm will begin to arrow and THEN you’ll roll over your forearm and wrist in your spiraling snap action. Your triceps will engage in the reach out action, as you fully extend your arm toward making contact. Almost at full arm arrow that’s when you’ll roll over your arm and wrist. That spiraling, revolving out action creates potentially great racquet head speed resulting from swinging momentum. In this catch and release drill, flow on thru with your full swing after your elbow arcs down and you catch it. Accelerate your arm as it’s unleashed into your outwards arc, as you swing faster to fly your racquet head out thru your imaginary ball at your routine contact spot…
—> …Arm loop imagery = Mentally keep in mind your forward swing is a throwin’ motion. For both strokes your thru swing is a hurling motion, with flare. In your bent racquet arm’s arc down, at loop’s bottom, the action is keyed on how you twist and load up your racquet arm. Unconsciously your lower arm is drawn in toward you, as you’re tossing and pointing your forearm and racquet head pointing back behind you via your small elbow arc forward. At the bottom of your loop, by drawing both arm parts together at the elbow, it creates the final windup and virtual final prep to maximize in your big swing out. The windup produces a classic pre-pitch throwing motion. You’ll continue your elbow arcing forward until your elbow comes up just short of your racquet arm shoulder. Then, as ball is arriving at your “spot”, with your shoulders assisting, you’ll sling your arm arcing out, around and thru, attacking the ball by revolving over your forearm and wrist torquing (twisting) your arrowing arm. Your rolling over your arm and wrist which will SNAP both of them hard, hurling your racquet head out creaming the ball…
—> …Bottom up forward swing = From the bottom up, build swing strength, as lower body leads stroke and peaks first. Your lower body’s action peaks first before your arm fully winds up and then releases to arc out into your loop climax. It’s key to bottom up swing both ways. First, set your feet and swing your arm and racquet back (backswing), as you load back on back foot. There you’re loading up the back of your stance. Then, as you push off and start looping your arm forward, you’ll fully windup your arm, as you’re arcing your elbow forward. When moving and building your lower body swing, continue arcing your arm and shoulders up above. You’ll keep building your arm windup, as elbow drives forward, even after your lower body motion peaks to catapult your dual shoulder spin. Windup your arm right up until your elbow almost draws fully forward to shoulder depth. But before your full windup and your big swing out, first max out your lower body action. Ideally upgrade the initial push off of your back foot and sway sideways into torquing (twisting) leg drive. Bend and ideally turn both knees. Turn your hips (when your back knee turns, because, when your back knee doesn’t turn, your legs are just riding along, not boosting your forward swing). As you move forward, begin to peak your leg action (bend) and crunch your core, which allows your body turn to flow upwards like a tornado to feed your upper body turn and shoulders’ spin. That augments the power of your shoulders catapulting your racquet arm out into your contact zone right after your lower body turn peaks. Your contact zone threshold starts when your elbow arc almost reaches the depth of your racquet arm shoulder. Entering your contact zone leads to your contact climax which ends when you’ll sweep your racquet head arcing thru the ball. After the contact zone ends at contact, still make sure you include a smoothing post contact follow-through, too…
—> …Here’s how to work your legs = To maximize your lower body work, train up the following contributing lower body actions. Perfect and include your legs and hips whenever doable in your bottom up thru swing. After getting your feet under you…it’s important to do the best with what you have set from racquet lift to top on into downswing …
—>  Lean in and turn = After swaying hips briefly sideways, transition into your smooth lower body turn…
—> (1a) Transition back foot push off into dual knee drive or turn
—> …Bend into front leg = Move forward into your bending front leg and ideally set open front foot. Of course your back leg is flexing, too. Ideally plié front leg. How that’s done is by optimally setting an open lead foot…and, as you push off back foot, turn front leg’s inner thigh out to face sidewall, as you bend into 1/2 a plié. Do that assisted by initially setting front foot slightly closer to sidewall with toes pointing slightly forward (open foot)…THAT is a partially closed stance. That optimizes what your front leg can contribute…
Inject new skills = Do something a lot…because…it gets inside you when you do it enough…
—>  Bend into swing while driving your legs = Drop down lower (in height) to play EVERY ball by bending BOTH knees. Do
THAT even when making higher contact from a more upright stance. Ideally drive both knees forward and turn into fully accepting, planted front foot. In solid lower body biomechanics, ideally bend knees out over your toes. Work feet below into weight transfer and also ideally encourage lower body rotation, as well, optimally by how you…
—>   Let hips flip = Don’t force hip spin, but don’t block your hip turn either. Avoid setting an overly closed front foot. Don’t point front foot back or set front foot way out closer to the sidewall than your back foot in a lunge position, as you step out to the sidewall in your front foot step up. It’s ideal to push off and pivot on the ball of your back foot. LET that action of your turning back knee into your open front foot drive your hip flip. Setting your feet emphasizing an open front foot and a parallel back foot combine to foster a beneficial hip flip and optimal body turn and minimally hip flip when you serve or have any setup…
—> (4) Exchange shoulder heights…with shoulders turning led by your elbow drive and working in concert with your lower body turn, spin your shoulders inside your contact spot throughout forward swing, as you…drop your back chest area. THAT is the magical move. Your chest area = your ribs up to your shoulder. As body turns and racquet arm elbow drives forward, with lower body maxing out in ITS spin below and as a major power booster, swing your shoulders around as a single unit, while actually inverting your shoulder heights by dropping your back shoulder. As accelerator and swing balancer, when led by bent elbow, exchanging your connected shoulders‘ level speeds up their spin. For each stroke, turn your shoulders with action to…
—>  …Spin your upper body diamond…by dropping back chest area… = For each stroke, the (magical) shoulder height exchange is fueled by dropping your back chest area, from ribs up to shoulder. As your shoulders turn, in upper body move, interchange shoulder heights for each stroke. That connected shoulder spin waves your upper body “diamond”. That diamond is formed by your 2 shoulders plus your waist. Turning that diamond strongly fuels your forward swing. Wave your diamond thru by changing your shoulder heights. Then your diamond turns and it will end up facing forward thru contact, as you chest up to your target…
-> …for forehand…fire back shoulder into action = As off arm draws in shutting down your front shoulder, drop and fire your back shoulder or back chest area which leads into dual shoulder turn, as your front shoulder rises…
-> …for backhand…drive racquet arm shoulder forward = Follow off hand fold in action, with straight line drive of your racquet arm shoulder turning forward. And, as you are turning both shoulders together, you’re slightly dropping your back chest area based on your off arm continuing flowing forward while trailing your racquet arm. Encourage flowing your off arm forward which multiplies your shoulder turn X 2. Keeping your off arm flowing forward ensures a strong dual shoulder rotation throughout your forward swing. Also that way your off arm ends up out in front of you after contact which creates very good body balance so you’re able to more quickly recover and move from where you stroke into defense…
—> (5) Bridge legs and core = as your arcing forward elbow almost reaches racquet arm shoulder depth, below… = put on the brakes by bending deeper into your knees AND crunch your core. There, when you’ve moved as far forward and turned as much as you can (or need to) behind the ball, brake your lower body with your front leg by bending into your lead leg. Also, with leg bend, begin to bridge your core or squeeze on your middle. This combo resisting move of legs and middle allows your upper body and shoulders to take over. That significantly boosts your arcing forward arm swing. There your trailing racquet arm that’s coming from behind is in turn ready to take over, after legs, core and shoulders fling your racquet arm out into its climactic arcing flow. *Note off hand fold in and core crunch brakes your non racquet arm side which allows your racquet arm side to propel your racquet arm climactically arcing out, as your forearm, wrist and racquet head are launched to come firing thru……
—>  …Body bridge = With legs braking, keep crunching core…connecting lower body to upper body. As your elbow reaches spot right behind shoulder, also be twisting your core and turning from the bottom up. That fuels peaking your shoulder spin. The full body spin projects your racquet arm elbow arcing out to attack the ball…
—> …stroke specifics for core crunch = The side your arm is on needs to be able to turn is your swing out thru the ball. Max out your core crunch to support optimizing your shoulders spin and racquet arm whip cracking. Your core is bridging or braking on side opposite contact or opposite your racquet arm. When swinging with your forehand, twist to crunch hardest on the front side of your body, while the back side comes firing thru via dual shoulder spin after drawing in your off hand. For your backhand, twist to bridge your trail side, as your off hand draws in, which allows your lead side to spin hardest. There your middle is prefacing your dual shoulder spin that’s about to peak above your core resulting in slinging your racquet arm arcing out…
—>  Keep spinning shoulders inwards = Keep your dual shoulders spinning, even after your racquet arm elbow draws level with racquet arm shoulder and your elbow is released outwards. Your shoulders will continue to spin inside your contact point, AFTER you make contact and throughout the impact phase of your contact swing right up until you chest up to your target wall…
—> …What happens as lower body turn reaches its peak and your elbow is approaching racquet arm shoulder depth? = Your core is crunching, your shoulders are spinning faster and faster and your elbow is closing in on the back of your racquet arm shoulder…as your arm is also flexing into torsion (twisting)…Here’s how to windup your arm at bottom of your loop…
—> …Max out building your arm torsion = As elbow almost reaches your contact zone threshold level with your racquet arm shoulder, as your arm is arcing forward, your elbow twists into full arm and wrist torsion vitally right there in mid downswing right before your contact swing will peak right as you wave your racquet head out thru ball…
—> …First, what is torsion? = Torsion or windup is done to fuel your optimum arm-wrist snap. As you arc your racquet arm elbow forward, it’s natural to…
—> …Rear back = Allow downswing to create crucial lag torsional energy at bottom of arm loop, as elbow almost fully draws forward behind racquet arm shoulder in your initial elbow arc down. There in your arc downward your elbow leads, as your elbow draws forward. Drawing your elbow forward will spontaneously windup your elbow and arm. There, in mid loop down, in your rear back move, your elbow twists up followed by hinging your wrist, in a dual twist. That creates key lag torsion at the very bottom of your forward swing loop. There, before momentously arcing out and thru the ball, both your twisted arm and cocked wrist get loaded for bear. Your winding up arm is readying and also feeding off body turn and your continuing shoulder spin. Your arm is just about to be monstrously unleashed to arc out away from you, even when using a finesse swing…
—> …Build lag = As your leg turn peaks and your body brakes, your shoulders boost slinging your loaded arm out. First, lag is accentuated by BOTH ARM AND WRIST torsion or TWISTING PREP. Max out windup torsion, in a rearing back windup mode…NOW, here’s how, why, where it’s done and how to optimize torsion energy in each forward swing…
(6) Twist racquet arm into torsion, as you rear back and windup, while unconsciously drawing lower arm IN to you, while elbow arcs forward to shoulder depth, stretching the bow that is your racquet arm = While drawing elbow forward toward racquet arm shoulder level, rear back and windup your elbow. At bottom, the magic ingredient is how, when drawing your elbow forward, the action naturally decreases the space between your lower arm and upper arm. That act of drawing your forearm in toward you twists up your arm and loads up your elbow with twisted torsion. There your wound up forearm points back, lagging, looming, REALLY ready…
—>  Lag…is due to the narrowing of your elbow angle, while drawing your forearm in to you. To windup your elbow at forward loop’s bottom creating lag, ALLOW elbow-arm twist into torsion, as your forearm subtly tugs in toward you. It’s like how you windup to pitch a ball or to skim a frisbee. That windup occurs at the beginning of your pitch or toss forward, not in your backswing. That windup occurs as you near the bottom of your tight elbow arc. Naturally, unconsciously draw your forearm IN to upper arm. THAT key action lightly twists up your elbow and arm. It loads up your whole arm with torsion energy. That twisted feel occurs right BEFORE the final arc out and snap of your arm and wrist, which is directly preceded by your shoulders catapulting your arm arcing out away from you. The snap phase is when you spring your arm out to thwack the ball. So, for emphasis, the twisting occurs, as your arm rears back to windup, by how your downswing subtly draws lower arm in to you. That rear back move nicely narrows your elbow angle a couple degrees, which twists up your racquet arm at the elbow building torsion energy throughout your arm. That energy will soon be vented in your final, peaking arm AND wrist snap…
—> …For backhand, retain bow-like arm angle = Don’t over bend your arm in loop down for your backhand. In rear back move, retain a little wider angle at your elbow for your backhand. For your backhand, as you draw your elbow forward, keep elbow angle a little bit wider at bottom of loop than a 90 degree right angle. Keep a bow-like elbow bend for your backhand. Don’t narrow elbow angle into a full right angle, like the elbow properly bends for your forehand. Keep forearm and upper arm a little further apart for your backhand. That way, when you swing out, around and thru, you won’t crowd the ball, get too over the top the ball and risk skipping in your backhand shot, which is something that happens a lot in racquetball. If you find yourself skipping in your backhand, first widen your elbow angle in your back and up backswing loop. Then, when looping your arm down, retain a wider elbow angle as you rear back. Note that bending the elbow into a right angle for your backhand doesn’t allow you to reach out and properly sweep your racquet out thru the ball…
—>  Cock wrist = In last step to prep. At very bottom of your arm loop, along with elbow twist, naturally tip racquet head in towards you. Tipping the racquet head in is the final windup action that will (7) draw thumb in to forearm, cocking your wrist. Now you’ve built up BOTH arm and NOW wrist kinetic torsion energy. You have full lag or readiness. You’re fully wound up. You are ready to unleash that coiled up energy, as your arm arcs out, arrows and you simultaneously snap BOTH arm and wrist. You’ll do that by rolling both over together fiercely waving your racquet head thru the ball. First, twist and hinge wrist toward your forearm, loading up, priming for your Big Forearm And Wrist SNAP. THAT is when you’ll torque your arm AND wrist, rotating your racquet head out thru the ball in the fastest section of your downswing. The snap is when you’ll rapidly and potentially very powerfully roll over your forearm and wrist scything your racquet head arcing out thru the ball…Here “uniques” for the strokes, include…
—> …for forehand full windup… = In loop down, hand and forearm turn to palm up, wrist is pulled in, and forearm angles back pointing at sidewall right behind you, with elbow tugged in and bent at a right angle…
—> for backhand…full readiness… = At loop’s trough, when fully wound up, your hand and forearm turn to palm down, your wrist is pulled inward, your knuckles diagonally point at you, and forearm points straight back, with racquet arm in a bow-like shape at about a 110 degrees…
—> Mid downswing windup = There’s a magic thing about these late windup moves. Take note how the dual torsion of arm twist and wrist cock takes place at your downswing loop’s bottom. That’s really the final prep which creates special lag that’ll let you really rip thru the ball…
—>  Commitment time = Ok, this is it. It’s contact time. It’s time for the second half of your downswing. It’s the stroke climax. This is when the ball is coming right into range when you’ll arc your bent arm out to roll over WITH your wrist right as you fully arrow your arm when, at the last second, spiraling your arm, wrist when racquet face over into your ball mashing SNAP!!!!…
—> …as ball is arriving off shoulder…ATTACK ball! As ball is just off shoulder (meaning out in front of your racquet arm shoulder), fling your arm arcing out thru the contacting the ball. THAT contact is your singular focus. Attack the ball at your universal contact point. In fact, emphasize THAT universal contact point (or uniform contact spot) throughout your entire stroking process. Use images of that contact spot, as your focus, when…
(1) moving your feet and eyes with the ball while you play its bounce;
(2) as an objective, when flicking your feet to set up behind your contact spot;
(3) putting in the effort to consistently prep your body and racquet behind that contact spot; and
(4) turning your body and arcing your arm into your all out attack on THAT contact spot…
–> First, get there behind your contact spot, NOT level with it, which is a common error, when a player just face guards the ball, planting right in front of it. Flick your feet to get behind the ball by about half a step and also start an arm and racquet reach away all day, every day. When setting your feet, be intent on planning to move in to THAT contact spot (you’ve picked and lined up behind). You’re about to attack with your ready, familiar arcing swing out, around and thru the ball. You’re not hammering at a ball somewhere roughly in your contact zone. You’re not just swinging your frame AT the ball. And you’re not fanning your racquet weakly thru the ball. You’re attacking your routine contact point. You’re committing to arc your arm out and swing your arm, wrist and racquet all the way thru your contact spot you’ve set up to attack. You attack AFTER you start to arc forward and draw your elbow up to shoulder depth, where you twist up and THEN project your arm out. That out arc is the kickoff of reaching out and spiraling over arm and wrist arcing thru contact zone, building into attacking and obliterating your key universal contact spot…
—> …using ball as your stimulus… = Looking ahead, use the ball as your stimulus as it nears your contact point out in front of your racquet arm shoulder…up until there your elbow has arced down until it’s right behind your racquet arm shoulder and your forearm is tossed back…your shoulders are turning toward catapulting your arm out, led by your elbow…after being slung out, your elbow coil will power arcing your forearm and racquet head out and around…then, just before contact your arm and wrist will combine to motor your racquet head out thru the ball, shaping your pictured shot. To swing out, around and thru the ball on an arc, you’ll weave and blend your forearm with your wrist. Time turning over your racquet head. Note that your downswing is a rhythmic swing. With reps, you’ll learn your very repeatable arm, wrist and racquet head spiraling flow and timing flowing your racquet face thru contact…
—> Stroking form rules = Victory favors the player who makes the fewest mistakes. For all its momentum quality, which is the result of the motion of moving your body and how you can load up and then speed your arm and wrist when turning your racquet head thru your forward swing…the key point is shot placement beats power (almost) every time. Great control via a repeatable, substantial form, beats great power without consistent accuracy. Develop your own reliable form to control your racquet head and pick shots you regularly take and familiarly make…
—> …What is your contact zone? = The zone that originates at the bottom of your downswing loop starts when your elbow has almost drawn up to shoulder depth. What starts there is your contact zone. The contact zone is an arching plane out away from you. At the front (or end) of that arching contact zone is your contact point or contact spot. That spot in the zone is off shoulder or just out in front of your racquet arm shoulder. Ideally THAT is where your swing peaks in your contact climax. That’s where you aim to wave your racquet head strongly out arcing thru the ball and then on toward your shot target…
—> …Where are YOUR contact spots? = Find your forehand and backhand contact spots. How you grip your racquet handle dictates your contact spot in relationship to your racquet arm shoulder. Your grip can also constrain your contact height. Note that ideally your off shoulder contact spot is routinely just a little further out in front of your shoulder for your backhand due to how you grip the handle. Train up adopting a grip that allows you to shoot from high contact to shoot very low, too. As you play, stick to YOUR routine contact spot. Too far out front contact or too deep in your stance behind your shoulder both would be like raising a sign saying, I’m hitting it THERE! Too far out front says “I’m going cross-court” – so defensively slide sideways. Deep contact says “I’m going for a sidewall shot” – so run forward. That’s way too revelatory and easy for the opponent. Tactically it’s better to make that routine off shoulder contact where your shot angle is harder to read. There you look like every shot you’re hitting is going straight in. Also, as you react to the bounce in rallies, your shoulder is always there; when often your feet are not. Mechanically it’s much improved to select a uniform contact spot, line up behind it as you prep, and then Light IT Up!…
—>  …Attack your contact spot = First, with shoulders assist, catapult racquet arm out. As ball is coming right into range and your arm has drawn forward just trailing your shoulder, with your shoulders spinning, attack contact. You’ve tucked in elbow right behind your racquet arm shoulder…Now!…start sling out and arrow your arm, and…
—> … (8) Attack ball, by catapulting still BENT racquet arm out…away from you. Project your elbow out by spinning your shoulders after your lower body has funneled up its rotating energy and mass or weight. Turn upper arm at your shoulder, and begin reaching out. Here, aided by body turn and dual shoulder spin, switch elbow from arcing down driving forward (with your non racquet side crunching) to slinging your arm arcing out. As it’s slung, begin to curve your arm OUT in a quick, small arc away from you (still) led by your racquet arm elbow. In that attacking arc, you’ll first begin to arrow your arm, by curving your forearm out. There, as the arm arcs out, after being slung, it’s motored by first extending your arm. Then your arm transitions into revolving over at the elbow and wrist, while also engaging your triceps to power your ideally leveraged, forceful arm extension…
—>  …(9) Flow thru butt to target = As key, interim swing phase – after you’ve begun arcing your arm out and nearing the end of straightening your arm – flow racquet thru butt-to-target. That means very briefly point your racquet butt cap at your shot target. That’s a very good checkpoint. You should pass thru butt-to-target during EACH forward swing. As you’re passing through butt to target, you’re swinging out, but your arm is still slightly bent and your elbow is still twisted. Also, your wrist is still cocked just a beat longer. There, in butt to target, your racquet strings very briefly face out to the sidewall. You’re readying to very forcefully wave your racquet strings around to viciously stomp on the pedal ripping your racquet head thru pounding the ball…
—>  …–> Use ball as your trigger = THERE’s the ball! Slingshot forearm out. Right as ball is reaching your selected contact point, use recognizing that spot is just up ahead as your trigger to catapult your lower arm out. Reach out to make contact. Do that by arrowing your arm first by arcing your forearm outwards. Then, to climax, flip your arm over, while also timing unhinging your wrist. As both roll over, they snap together. Right as you fully extend your arm, you’ll roll over your arm and wrist which rolls over your racquet face thru the ball. You’re timing that roll over to make strings to ball contact shaping your planned shot path. No short-arming your forward swing where you don’t reach out fully. Also, don’t reach out too early and swing with a stiff, straight arm thru the final part of the swing arc…Here are the proper biomechanics to snap your arm and wrist…
—>  …Key on your spiraling arm and wrist action = Looking ahead, note that the final part of the arm arrowing action is done by corkscrewing (= spiraling) your arm, wrist AND racquet head starting right before and as you swing your racquet head thru the ball. It’s not done by just flapping the racquet head side to side. It’s done by timing your snap. To attack contact, optimally you’ll reach out and then, after your racquet butt faces your target, you’ll spiral over your forearm and wrist arcing out away from you. That occurs as your arm spins at the elbow in the final part of arrowing your arm. At climax, you’ll complete extending your arm via forearm turn over and wrist roll. (Magically) simultaneously (or is it consecutively?) intertwine twisting your forearm converging with torquing your wrist. There, at your swing climax, you crack the whip. Whip cracking is a combination arm-wrist roll over snap. That whip action IS the magic sought as your swing climax. It’s where and when you’ll roll over your arm meshed WITH your wrist snapping them both together, hard. You time the arm and wrist spiral so you’re able to angle your strings to hit the ball right where you picture your shot should be going. That snap fires your racquet head out compressing the ball and projecting it forward as you accelerate thru contact…
—> Strings angle at contact = Note that something is still needing definition. How does the racquet head point right when you swing thru making contact? You’re making a little swing magic, as you first start by …
—> (10) Rapidly (magically) wave your forearm from back to front = THIS is THE most preternatural part of the mechanics of your forward swing. The flip-over of your arm and wrist shows how magnificently we’re designed and how the arm and wrist CAN move in awesome synchrony. The beginning of your forearm wave readies you to combine both arm and wrist into their huge, snapping crescendo. The combo arm-wrist action builds to a peak in your forward swing right as you wave your racquet head thru the ball. From the forearm pointing back and racquet strings facing out to the sidewall in racquet butt to target, turn over your forearm in a blink, actually from your shoulder all the way down thru your elbow to whirling over your forearm. In that blink of an eye, you turn your forearm from pointing back to pointing forward. You do that by turning over your lower arm, which rotates your forearm from pointing back to pointing front. Midway in that forearm wave, you swing your racquet head thru right as you point your racquet head tip at the sidewall. There you turn your racquet face to point at your selected wall target. To do that switch, from back to front, flip your lower arm over extremely fast. There, starting at butt to target, ALSO compound your arm whirl adding in rolling over your wrist, as they combine waving your racquet head thru the ball. Practiced up the forearm flip or wave meshing with your wrist roll is done with great wizardry. Their combo allows you to make contact in a wide range from shoe tops low up to even collarbone high. From rib high on up the swing motion is flowing over top the ball…
—> …for backhand… simulate backhand frisbee toss motion with your forearm and wrist. Use biomechanics of tossing a frisbee. Although it allows a little less forearm flip for your backhand due to differences in your body biomechanics…still very quickly flip or turn, from palm and forearm facing down, all the way thru knuckles pointing forward right as you swing your racquet head thru the ball. After contact, keep turning until your palm and underside of your forearm face out at the sidewall in front of you. This is the same swing motion as hurtling a disc downfield, as your ultimate frisbee backhand kickoff that you’re sending way back deep in the opponent’s end zone…
—> …for your forehand…pronate. Flip your forearm all the way over and ideally finish curving pulling inwardly with your forearm and wrist, too. You’re swinging, starting palm up at the bottom of your loop, thru butt to target all the way to turning over to palm forward at contact and on to palm (and forearm) pointed down and in after contact. That other interpretation for pronation, pulling your arm and wrist in strongly toward you ensures your curving arc. Do both, down and continuing arcing in…
—> Why is pulling in the perfect ending? = The pull in with both your forearm and wrist (for both strokes) multiplies your great (magical) arcing arm and wrist momentum. The pulling in action melds arm and wrist into arcing AND turning over together with an irresistible curving inter-play in toward you right after your contact climaxes maximally, as you…
—>  (11) SuperFast interweave rolling wrist with flipping over forearm = THIS is THE glue that ensures your contact climax IS momentous and magical. Into forearm flip add rolling wrist. With elbow drawn forward to back of shoulder and forearm already beginning to reach out – with contact just up ahead – release and mesh wrist WITH spiraling over forearm. So forearm turn over and wrist joins to compound the roll over. In this most powerful, speediest racquet head action, extend your arm and, right before arrowing, unhinge and weave your wrist spinning arm and wrist revolving over together. It’s a combo torque of both forearm and wrist. By torque that means twist, which causes rotation. Fluidly link wrist with spinning over forearm, snapping them both together. Simple image: roll over racquet head thru ball. Roll racquet strings from pointing at sidewall to pointing at target wall thru contact to continue rolling over until your racquet face angles down after contact, for either stroke. Note that often you’ll tip your strings to point down lower on target wall when making contact for many of your shots that you mean to shoot downwards. So often your racquet head is turning to bevel or slant or slope forward, which means you’re turning your racquet face often to lean diagonally forward at the exact moment right when you swing thru the ball. That’s done to form a high to low shot angle. That occurs even when making contact from as low as shin high and shooting slightly downward when going for your 2-bounce kill-shot before the ball reached the first line, 15 feet back. A few balls you’ll hit on a rope forward, like when you make ankle bone low contact and shoot a kill-shot or when hitting your more direct to the front wall drive Z serve. Optimally you hit a preponderance of your shots slightly downwards so you don’t generate a left up ball that rebounds off the front wall to bounce and then pop off the back wall as a big plumb back wall setup…
—>  Curving swing = Place great importance on your curving swing action. The swing thru contact optimally is a curving spiral of your racquet head curving out thru contact and after curving back in toward you with your forearm and wrist turning over. Your arm and wrist curve in an arc flowing out away from you, as your forearm turns over and your wrist rolls flowing your racquet head thru the ball. In the last phase toward making contact, the curving motion is a climactic, ever widening, ever expanding, spiraling spin of forearm AND wrist powering rolling over of your racquet head, as you…Snappow!!!…EXPLODE your racquet head curving out thru the ball! Then continue wrist, arm and racquet arc, as you initially flow on toward your target. Then continue curving your racquet, wrist and forearm in towards you. Of course, for a touch shot, dial down the force when flowing your arm and wrist turn over, with finesse. Still make sure to always accelerate your racquet head right as you curve your racquet head thru the ball. Although don’t slow down any swing into impact. That preferred acceleration thru the ball ensures solid stroking form and solid ball contact…
—> The Ending “feel” =
Critically, as you become self aware of your racquet face, you feel where your racquet face is right as you make contact. Then you become able, when on balance, to shoot from chest high on down to shooting from ankle bone low when going for a wide assortment of kill-shots. That means you’ve done your homework and you know when what winning shot works where, and you’re fearless taking all of ‘em!…
—> …Shot path making = Via your racquet head’s directional flow and how you roll over and tilt your racquet face right when your racquet head turns thru the ball onto the part you pinpoint which includes where you place your strings on that part all 3 contribute to creating your chosen shot path. And you may optionally impart ball spin, as well. When your racquet face points down slightly, you shoot downwards. If your racquet face angles out, you hit the ball out away from you toward the side of the court you face. If your racquet face angles in toward you, you hit cross-court. Spin occurs based on how you flow the racquet head thru directionally AND it bears on how you contact a certain part of the ball, as you angle your racquet face. For instance, when making contact just above the equator or middle of the back of the ball and when also contacting the ball just a tad bit lower on your strings and closer to you than the center in back, plus starting your swing inside and flowing it out produces inside out ball spin which causes the ball to revolve in toward the sidewall as the ball is spiraling and flowing forward toward your picked and then shaped sidewall or front wall target. That in to out ball spin and topspin could create a sidewall shot that you strike targeting a spot on the sidewall up ahead of you and lower than contact, with your intent to keep your shot down very low coming off the front wall. Also the in to out spin could be the spin used to hit a down the wall shot that strikes the front wall a little under halfway over from where you contact it to the sidewall making the ball rebound out and ideally stay in very tight along the sidewall on the shot’s way back in the court. You define spin with your racquet’s directional flow, the part of ball contacted, your racquet face angle thru contact and where on your string bed you place the ball. Note that to control your shot angle and add spin, as another perspective, you may just simply move the ball on your strings and flow your racquet head towards your wall target. For instance, pull the ball in on the strings closer to you and drop the ball slightly, while swinging across your body, and you hit your shot cross-court with topspin. So here again, a spiraling ball results, with sidespin (outside in) and overspin…
—> (12) Constantly finish by arcing your arm and wrist in toward you, after driving your racquet head thru the ball = Finish EACH swing pulling inwardly with your arm AND wrist. For your backhand, pull in even though you do so a little less extremely than you do for your more naturally, expansively curving forehand. That’s because of the way you’re built. When angling your shot downwards, the inwards pulling move for both strokes emphasizes your final arm-wrist arcing turn over into a very strong, very quick racquet face closing action and pulling in follow-through. Turning to close your racquet face means your strings go from facing out to sidewall, when flowing thru butt to target, to swinging your racquet head around facing your target thru contact. There, by feel, you often bevel your strings leaning forward. THERE your racquet head often is turning over to slope or close to very frequently point down lower on your target wall right as you flow your strings thru the ball; as opposed to after contact. There, at contact, tipping your racquet face slightly forward occurs as you’re swiping thru the ball. Afterward pulling your wrist and arm on an arc in towards you ensures you strongly flow thru the ball. Understand that in the full loop down you first arc your elbow down in tight to you, while pointing your forearm and racquet head backwards. There, as your elbow loop is drawing forward, you twist up your racquet arm and cock your racquet in toward you. Then, to swing out and attack the ball, you begin to fling your arm out and extend your arm, while very briefly pointing your racquet strings out at the sidewall you face. Then, by spiraling over your forearm AND your wrist, you turn your racquet strings to point toward your chosen wall target right as you’re waving your racquet head thru the ball. After contact, you keep turning over your racquet head to initially flow right after the ball, sealing your shot path or trajectory. After initially following after the ball, you pull inwards with a finishing arm and wrist arc. Optionally, swinging thru contact, you could angle your strings to tilt back for a rare slice motion to knife your shot with back spin. For very low contact and to hit a shot on a rope to your low target, your racquet face could be flat or parallel to the and result in no spin. That low to low shooting situation with zero spin occurs very infrequently. Even there, at very low contact, a slight over the top motion adds useful topspin. That overspin helps keep the ball down lower as it rebounds off the front wall to bounce earlier and keep spinning over as the ball retreats in the court. More commonly you slant your strings forward toward your target wall exactly as you’re swinging thru the ball. For those more frequent downwards shot angling, you time WHEN to turn over your arm and wrist in collaboration, as you drive your racquet head thru the ball. It’s done by feel when and how much to slope your racquet face forward right when you swing thru your contact spot and where on the ball you place your strings. Optionally you may conceive of it as dropping the ball ever so slightly on your racquet head to shoot your shot low. That combo of controlling your racquet flow and placing the ball on your strings aids in conceptually and then actually forming your downwards shot path. It also adds overspin that keeps the ball down lower caroming off the front wall. That top is retained after the shot’s first bounce which keeps the ball down lower and adds to its speed. After contact, ALWAYS initially go on following through toward your wall target. After that short burst forward, continue looping your racquet head around to point it at the sidewall behind you, while pulling the racquet arcing in to you. YOU control timing turning over or closing your racquet face and how your strings point slightly down on your target wall right as you flow your racquet thru the ball when looking to shape a desired declining shot path. Work at it. Like overspin and declining shot angle swinging it to out or outside in also can make your horizontal placement shooting versatile. The ultimate objective is flexibility. You want to place the ball virtually anywhere in the court after you get your feet under you and you loop your racquet back. Then downswing improvise to win the rally or turn it in your favor…
—> Let it Go = It’s key to NOT put on the brakes where you ever stop your forward swing or slow it down before swinging fully thru the ball. That’s even the case when laying down a super low drop shot from inches away from the front wall or when lofting up a wallpaper lob serve. Also avoid a recoil or snap back action right after making contact. That would be unhelpful, discourage a fluid swing, and possibly cause stress to your wrist, elbow, shoulder or even your lower back. Allow your forearm and wrist to roll over. Don’t brake by attempting to swing thru with a stiff wrist to just arm your shot. Don’t just fan the racquet head thru side to side as a wrist pop instead of the much more effective forearm-wrist rolling over SNAP. Drill up the skill to roll over your arm AND wrist. A sideways only action would cause an underpowered kluge action instead of a sound, natural arm and wrist rolling over swing powered by silky smooth biomechanics. Also that side to side action could cause a recoil action. A recoil could stress the outside of your forearm (backhand) or the inside of your lower arm (forehand). Consistently climax your forward contact swing as you……S-weep with->N-o brakes->A-round->P-ulling In = S-N-A-P…
—>  Stay on shot path = Follow ball along shot’s path with your continuing racquet head swing. Seal your shot path with your initial racquet flow following right after the ball towards its target. So, after contact, swing on to target (for emphasis). After pointing the very top of the racquet head at the sidewall you face when swinging thru making contact, then briefly flow racquet head an extra beat longer following right along shot path the ball is taking. There you’re emphasizing making both your swing flow and the ball you struck head directly at your pictured wall target. THAT emphasis adds extra oomph or punch to your shot. It also ensures more consistent shot placements.
—> Roll over = Post contact continue rolling over your arm and wrist. For each stroke…
-> …for forehand, post contact, point strings down at floor = AFTER contact, continue rolling over your racquet arm and wrist until your racquet strings point down at the floor out in front of you, in a palm down finish. Also go on to pull your arm and wrist inwards towards you, completing your full pronated, curving swing thru contact. In a full sense, pronating includes arm and wrist turn over thru contact to point your strings down AND that strong arcing swing of your forearm and wrist ends up pulling your racquet and arm in strongly towards you, as well…
-> …for backhand, post contact, point knuckles down at floor = Racquet arm hand knuckles that point back in backswing and turn to point at sidewall, when swinging around thru butt to target, continue on until the knuckles point at your wall target when you swing thru contact. Then, post contact, continue turning over your wrist until your knuckles point down at the floor out in front of you. Note that, after contact, minimally flow all the way until your palm and the underside of your forearm both point out at the sidewall you stand facing, as you continue to swing forward after contact. For your biggest backhand strokes, you may even turn your forearm and hand all the way to palm up, as you “supinate” fully for your most extreme Topspin backhand. Rolling over to knuckles pointing down after contact is plenty and much more than when blocking your wrist turn and being left to just strong-arm or stiff arm flap the racquet thru the ball, as a forced, muscled backhand.
—>  Follow-through naturally = Flow racquet head on around behind you. After contact and flowing racquet head briefly on toward your target, go on to complete your full looping swing and its full follow-through. Allow racquet head and racquet arm to circle around behind you. Note that right when making contact your arm is passing your racquet arm shoulder right when you flow your racquet head thru contact, with your arm extended. Try that out for yourself. You’ll see what that looks like and feels like, when making contact out front right as you extend your arm and wave your racquet head thru the ball…
—> Rebend arm for your forehands = Specific to your forehand…you’ll re-bend your arm in your follow-through AFTER contact and having initially flowed forward tailing right after the ball you just stroked…
—> Loop up shoulder high = Finish with racquet head routinely looping up to (about) shoulder high. Loop racquet head around behind you allowing racquet head to naturally rise to about shoulder level. Develop your swing where you don’t loop it up much higher than shoulder height. At the end of your full forward swing, allow your racquet head to rise up naturally. Your arm should finish lower than head high. That’s because it’ll keep your shots down lower. If there’s too much of an up part to the loop in the second half of your full downswing and completion of your thru swing, as you’re flowing into your follow-through, you could spray the ball way up high on your target wall. That could cause your shot to ultimately strike way up high on the front wall and possibly result in a much unwanted back wall setup for the opponent…
—>  Recover, rebalance, reposition = With arms finishing out in front of you, rebalancing after stroking the ball is much more efficient. Push from front to back foot. By first pushing to your back foot off your heavier front foot, you are readying to move to cover for your shot’s placement. You’re looking to defend. You’re ready to keep playing! Note that moving to center court to defend and having a penchant to be ready and pumped to leave from there in center court to track down and play the opponent’s shot keeps your game sharp and your chances of shooting on balance and effectively higher for you next time.
In summary…
As your swing builds to a crescendo, it’s key to realize that there at impact, as your racquet is turning at its fastest, your dominance over your swing and your racquet head must be magnified so you have agency to direct the ball right where you choose, where you pictured and now right where you’re shaping your shot path.